Aug 12, 2020
BASF’s Versys Inscalis insecticide approved for use in California crops 

BASF’s Versys insecticide has received registration for use in California on a variety of crop groups, including brassicas/cole crops, leaf and stem vegetables, pome fruit and stone fruit. Versys insecticide delivers effective control against aphids while being gentle on beneficial insects and pollinators.

“Aphids can cause serious damage to specialty crops, impacting crop quality, yield and growers’ bottom line,” Chad Asmus, product manager, specialty cop insecticides, said in a news release. “Versys insecticide targets these challenging insects with a unique set of benefits now available to California growers.”

Versys insecticide is powered by the Inscalis insecticide active ingredient, a unique mode of action sub-class (IRAC 9D) which disrupts the sensory responses of target insects to quickly stop their feeding.  As the only IRAC 9D currently registered for use, Versys insecticide gives California growers a new tool to manage insect resistance. 

The newly available benefits of Versys insecticide to California growers include: 

  • Fast onset of action: Versys insecticide quickly stops feeding damage 
  • Unique mode of action class: Versys insecticide has been classified by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) as the only member in the new mode of action subgroup 9D
  • Complements parasitic and predatory control: Versys insecticide preserves beneficial insects for Integrated Pest Management
  • No pollinator restrictions:  Versys insecticide offers application freedom with a pollinator compatible mindset

Versys insecticide joins its sister product Sefina Inscalis insecticide, which also controls key piercing and sucking insects in a variety of row and specialty crops, including cucurbits, fruiting vegetables, cotton and citrus. Sefina insecticide received registration for use in California in June 2020.

To learn more, contact your local BASF representative or visit here.




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