Nov 16, 2021
Biological pesticide by Vestaron available to growers in Mexico

Vestaron announced Nov. 16 that its bioinsecticide, SPEAR-Lep, has been approved as the newest biological pesticide available to growers in Mexico.

The approval across international borders solidifies Vestaron’s commitment to empowering growers with novel, effective chemistries that address proven neuromuscular targets using peptides to overcome existing pesticide resistance issues. The chemistries also offer a desired safety profile for workers, bees, beneficials and the environment.

Vestaron is taking the mission of a peptide-based revolution in crop protection into Mexico with the approval SPEAR-Lep. Targeting lepidopteran pests such as caterpillars, loopers and “worms,” field trials with SPEAR-Lep demonstrate performance equivalent to conventional insecticides. With its novel mode of action (IRAC Group 32), SPEAR-Lep is a valuable new tool for IPM programs.

With an initial crop focus in crucifers, tomatoes and peppers, the Peptide emPOWERed Technology of SPEAR-Lep offers growers in Mexico the same desired benefits as in the U.S.: 0-day PHI, 4-hour REI, MRL exemption and practically non-toxic to pollinators.

“Approval of the SPEAR-Lep label in Mexico is another big win for Vestaron, allowing us to gain strides toward our mission,” Ben Cicora, SVP sales and marketing at Vestaron, said in a news release “We will bring the product to market through our Vestaron territory managers as well as partnerships with key regional distribution channel partners.”

Daniel Peck, director of field development at Vestaron, is pleased with results from the first few dozen trials completed in country.

“Field experiments with third party contractors confirm the success that we have in the U.S. Now they are being supported by larger scale demo trials in key growing regions of the country,” Peck said.

Growers within Mexico can find out more about SPEAR-Lep and Vestaron at mx.vestaron.com.




Current Issue

August 2022 issue of Vegetable Growers News

Family, dedication fuel Georgia onion grower’s success

West Coast growers battle water shortages

University of Idaho researchers help develop solar-powered weeding robot

SC farming family legacy passes century mark

Greenhouse operation grows, processes and serves tomato dishes to tourists

Tools, techniques don’t solve celery meltdown

Great Lakes EXPO: Delivering the ultimate farm market

Farm Market column: What’s the difference between markup and profit?

Ag Labor Review: Will 2022 be remembered as the Year of Ag Labor Regulations?

see all current issue »

Be sure to check out our other specialty agriculture brands

produceprocessingsm Organic Grower