Nov 17, 2016
Fastac CS insecticide receives EPA registration

BASF’s new Fastac CS insecticide formulation received registration from the Environmental Protection Agency for use in more than 150 crops, including corn, soybeans, leafy vegetables, and tree nuts. Fastac CS insecticide is labeled for control of over 100 insect pests, including caterpillars, aphids, stink bugs and thrips. The new microencapsulated formulation of Fastac insecticide helps maximize yield potential by protecting crops against insect damage, with improved application and handling properties, according to BASF.

“The enhanced Fastac CS insecticide formulation provides excellent spray coverage, ensuring even distribution on the plant leaf surface for improved performance,” said Christa Ellers-Kirk, technical market manager, BASF. “The insecticide provides control of a wide variety of insect pests for many key crop families.”

Field research trials conducted by BASF show improvements in spray retention and spreading properties over competitive pyrethroids.

In the event of inadvertent exposure, Fastac CS insecticide, which is considered a non-skin sensitizer, reduces problematic “pyrethroid” itch, according to the company. It is an encapsulated pyrethroid available to growers that is labeled as a “caution” signal word.

Fastac CS is a Restricted Use Pesticide. It is for retail sale to and for use only by certified applicators, or persons under their direct supervision. See the product label for more information.

For more information about Fastac CS, please visit: www.FastacCSInsecticide.com.




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