Jan 7, 2016
USDA, HHS release new dietary guidelines

HHS and USDA have released the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

The 8th edition of the Dietary Guidelines includes five overarching guidelines and suggestions on foods Americans should consume. The guidelines focus on the variety of what people eat and drink and updated guidance on topics such as added sugars, sodium, and cholesterol, and new information on caffeine.

The specific recommendations fit into five overarching guidelines in the new edition:

  • Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan.
  • Focus on variety, nutrient-dense foods and amount
  • Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats, and reduce sodium intake
  • Shift to healthier food and beverage choices
  • Support healthy eating patterns for all.

The guidelines suggest Americans should consume:

  • A variety of vegetables, including dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy and other vegetables
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grains
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), soy products, and nuts and seeds
  • Oils, including those from plants: canola, corn, olive, peanut, safflower, soybean, and sunflower. Oils also are naturally present in nuts, seeds, seafood, olives, and avocados.

The guidelines also recommend Americans consume less than:

  • 10 percent of calories per day from added sugars.
  • 10 percent of calories per day from saturated fats.
  • 2,300 milligrams per day of sodium for people over the age of 14 years and less for those younger.

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines was informed by the recommendations of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The guidelines are updated every five years.

Visit the Dietary Guidelines website to view the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.




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