Nov 1, 2021
Onions recalled from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms

The FDA, along with Centers for Disease Control and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Oranienburg infections linked to whole, fresh onions. FDA’s traceback investigation is ongoing but has identified ProSource Produce, LLC (also known as ProSource Inc.) of Hailey, Idaho, and Keeler Family Farms of Deming, New Mexico, as suppliers of potentially contaminated whole, fresh onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico.

FDA has posted a list of additional recalls being conducted by retailers that may have received recall onions from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms. This list includes recalls conducted by companies that further processed the onions by using them as ingredients in new products or by repackaging them. It is possible that this list may not include all retailers who have received these onions; however, this list is based on the best information currently available to the FDA and will be updated as more information becomes available.

As of October 29, the CDC is reporting that there are 808 illnesses across 37 states and Puerto Rico. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued an advisoryExternal Link Disclaimer for recalled onions that were imported to Canada. To date, there are no illnesses in Canada linked to this outbreak.

FDA’s investigation is ongoing to determine the source of contamination and if additional products or firms are linked to illness. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendation 

Advice for restaurants, retailers and consumers: Do not eat, sell or serve recalled onions, or products containing recalled onions. All recalled onions were supplied by ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms and imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico between July 1, 2021 and Aug. 31, 2021. FDA has posted a list of additional recalls being conducted by retailers that may have received recall onions from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms. This list includes recalls conducted by companies that further processed the onions by using them as ingredients in new products or by repackaging them. It is possible that this list may not include all retailers who have received these onions; however, this list is based on the best information currently available to the FDA and will be updated as more information becomes available. If you cannot tell if your onions were recalled, do not eat, sell, or serve them and throw them out.

Onions may last up to three months if stored in a cool, dry place. Restaurants, retailers, and consumers who suspect having purchased such onions may still have them in storage and should not eat, sell, or serve them, and should throw them out.

FDA recommends that anyone who received or suspects having received recalled onions use extra vigilance in cleaning and sanitizing any surfaces and containers that may have come in contact with these products to reduce the risk of cross-contamination. This includes cleaning and sanitizing cutting boards, slicers, countertops, refrigerators, displays, and storage bins.

Consumers who have symptoms of Salmonella infection should contact their health care provider. Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.

Suppliers and Distributors: Do not use, ship, or sell recalled onions. Suppliers and distributors that re-package raw onions should use extra vigilance in cleaning any surfaces and storage areas that may have come into contact with these products. If there has been potential cross contamination or mixing of onions from other sources with these products, suppliers and distributors should discard all co-mingled and potentially cross-contaminated product.

Recall Information

FDA has posted a list of additional recalls being conducted by retailers that may have received recall onions from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms. This list includes recalls conducted by companies that further processed the onions by using them as ingredients in new products or by repackaging them. It is possible that this list may not include all retailers who have received these onions; however, this list is based on the best information currently available to the FDA and will be updated as more information becomes available.

ProSource Produce LLC has voluntarily recalled red, yellow, and white onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 31, 2021. Additional descriptors used for these onion types may include, but are not limited to, jumbo, colossal, medium, summer and sweet onions. Additional recall information will be made public as soon as it is available from ProSource Inc.

The onions were distributed to wholesalers, broadline foodservice customers, and retail or grocery stores in:

  • 50 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., 5 lb., 3 lb., and 2 lb. mesh sacks
  • 50 lb., 40 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., and 5 lb. cartons

And by the following distributors and/or under the following brands:

  • Big Bull
  • Peak Fresh Produce
  • Sierra Madre
  • Markon First Crop.
  • Markon Essentials
  • Rio Blue
  • ProSource
  • Rio Valley
  • Sysco Imperial

Keeler Family Farms has recalled red, yellow, and white whole, fresh onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 25, 2021. The onions were distributed in 25lb and 50lb mesh sacks. They contain a label that is marked as “MVP (product of MX)”.

Additional details regarding the recalled products are available on the Keeler Family Farms recall announcement.

Recalls have also been initiated by companies that sold recalled onions or products containing the recalled onions.




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