Apr 7, 2016
USDA launches first local foods survey

The USDA has begun conducting the 2015 Local Food Marketing Practices Survey. USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is conducting this first-time survey to produce official benchmark data on the local food sector in the United States.USDAlogo

The Local Food Marketing Practices Survey will ask producers for information on their production and local marketing of foods during the 2015 calendar year. Information includes the value of food sales by marketing channel (i.e. farmers markets, community supported agriculture (CSA) arrangements, restaurants, roadside stands, food hubs, and more), value of crop and livestock sales, marketing practices, expenses, Federal farm program participation, and more.

Information from the survey will be published in December. The data will be used for decisions and programs that support local and regional food systems, including:

  • USDA Agricultural Marketing Service’s Farmers Market Promotion Program, Local Food Promotion Program, Specialty Crop Block Grants Program.
  • USDA Farm Service Agency’s Microloan Program.
  • USDA Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentives Program, a collaboration between USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture and USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service
  • USDA Food and Nutrition Service’s efforts to expand EBT availability at farmers markets
  • State and local agencies’ support and promotion of local food markets
  • Farmers’ and ag organizations’ business and marketing strategies
  • Researchers’, extension’s and university members’ local foods research

Producers who receive the 2015 Local Food Marketing Practices Survey from NASS are strongly encouraged to respond, USDA said. Farmers and ranchers can fill out the survey online via a secure website, www.agcounts.usda.gov, or return their form by mail.

For more information about the 2015 Local Food Marketing Practices Survey, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov.




Current Issue

August 2022 issue of Vegetable Growers News

Family, dedication fuel Georgia onion grower’s success

West Coast growers battle water shortages

University of Idaho researchers help develop solar-powered weeding robot

SC farming family legacy passes century mark

Greenhouse operation grows, processes and serves tomato dishes to tourists

Tools, techniques don’t solve celery meltdown

Great Lakes EXPO: Delivering the ultimate farm market

Farm Market column: What’s the difference between markup and profit?

Ag Labor Review: Will 2022 be remembered as the Year of Ag Labor Regulations?

see all current issue »

Be sure to check out our other specialty agriculture brands

produceprocessingsm Organic Grower